film

Compassionate Care: The Happiness in Giving Service With Jessica MacLeod

Jessica MacLeod, PhD, is the nurse practitioner who takes us inside the world we see in the documentary Invisible Patients ~ a film born out of her years tending to the elderly and gravely ill, people who are housebound and falling through the cracks of our healthcare system.  

Jessica talks with Susan about her personal burnout from  being on the front lines, the obstacles in our culture and in our health-care system that neglect the people who need health care the most, and how the idea of “teamwork” within the hierarchical structure of our medical system is slow in coming.

The five years in service was a steep learning curve for Jessica; joyous, eye opening, and at times overwhelming. She learned about her own limits, the need to balance work/life, and how to mediate the guilt of leaving her co-workers and patients by turning it into advocacy for better care for the marginal in our society.


Meet This Episode's Guest

Jessica MacLeod

Jessica MacLeod received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Fairfield University in Fairfield, CT in 1996. She went on to receive a Master of Science in Nursing – Family Nurse Practitioner (2003) and a PhD in Nursing Science (2009) from Indiana University in Indianapolis, IN.

Her nursing career includes bedside nursing on a renal – telemetry unit at a large teaching hospital in Connecticut, a staff nurse at a nursing home for patients with dementia in Grantham, England, and a college health nurse.

As a nurse practitioner she has worked in family practice and a home based primary care practice.

She lives in Evansville, Indiana with her husband James, daughter Eilidh, and sons Calum and Gavin.

 

Visit the Invisible Patients website for more information about the film!

 
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I really just want the audience to see the people I see – how they live, what challenges they face in terms of health, economics, addiction, lack of education. I just want people to know that these invisible patients are here, among us – they’re in our communities, and we need to do more to take care of them.
— Jessica Macleod, Nurse Practitioner, THE INVISIBLE PATIENTS
 

Stripping Away Our Masks: Finding Our Common Humanity Through Film with Gabriele Schafer

Gabriele Schafer was born in Germany and from the age of eleven grew up in America. Being “different” at that age was painful; she didn’t fit in, wasn’t accepted by her peers, and longed to return to Germany - and then fate intervened. She was cast as Lady MacDuff in a reading of Macbeth in junior high school.

The warm encouragement she received put her on a life’s path toward acting; Yale Drama School and the co-founding (with her husband) of a socially engaged theatre company, Thieves Theatre (now International Culture Lab).

Through her many years of dedication to acting in film and theatre, her co-directing of ICL, and an immersion in Butoh (a Japanese Dance Form) her motivating force has always been “to communicate and transform by stripping away all the masks to find our common humanity; to leap into the radical acceptance of yourself and the world, to discover that you are enough, just as you are.”


Meet This Episode's Guest

 

Gabriele Schafer

Gabriele was born and raised in Germany, educated and trained in theater in the US.  She is an actor, producer and translator committed to political and social engagement for over 40 years. Since 1980, she has been co-artistic director with her husband Nick Fracaro of International Culture Lab, dedicated to providing opportunities for artists from across the world to explore contemporary issues through jointly created projects. She holds and MFA from the Yale School of Drama and a BA in Criminal Justice from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

 

Find out more about Gabriele from her website: gabrieleschafer.com

And don't forget to check out her theatre company: intlculturelab.org


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“The world is made for people who aren’t cursed with self-awareness.”

~ Annie in “Bull Durham”

Heal Ourselves, Heal others: Transforming Consciousness Through Filmmaking with Gretl Claggett

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Like all good story tellers, actor/poet Gretl Claggett came into filmmaking through her own intriguing narrative. Her main character in a novel she had written had a backstory of childhood sexual abuse. The condition for publishing the novel was to excise that backstory. She said “No.”

After being shut down, she courageously took that story of abuse - which was her own - and made the short film Happy Hour: a beautiful artful film which helps people see  the conscious and unconscious complicity inherent in childhood sexual abuse.

Gretl’s abuse began when she was very young and continued until she was 16, when she finally told her mother. She talks with Susan about how acting saved her life - allowing her to become other people, escape her own reality - and her healing journey through the deep labyrinth of recovery - the difficult work of peeling back the layers of rage and shame, at the perpetrator, her parents and herself.

Gretl’s mission is “to create powerful stories through the medium of film and other innovative technologies that entertain and transform consciousness.” She is well on her way!


Meet This Episode's Guest

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Gretl Claggett

GRETL CLAGGETT (Writer/Creative Director/Filmmaker) hails from Hannibal, Missouri, also Mark Twain’s boyhood home. Her first film Happy Hour — narrated by Julianne Moore — is based on a poem from her book, MONSOON SOLO: Voices Once Submerged (WordTech, 2012).


Happy Hour screened as an official selection at 17 festivals, winning several awards and honors, and garnering praise from Oscar-winning Writer/Director Robert Benton: “Happy Hour is a lush, elegiac film about an extremely difficult subject and Ms. Claggett handles it masterfully.”


The film is now available on iTunes and Amazon in association with a nonprofit campaign: all download proceeds go to a small group of nonprofits whose focus is treating and preventing sexual abuse and promoting healthy relationships.


Gretl wrote and directed Sony's first-ever 4K 360° cinematic music video, which premiered at the 2015 Consumer Electronics Show and was featured in Sony’s activation at SXSW. As an actress, she performed at many New York theaters — such as Playwrights Horizons, Circle in the Square, Soho Rep, La MaMa and HERE — and at many regional theaters, including Actors
Theater of Louisville. She holds MFAs in Poetry, Creative Nonfiction and Acting, and is currently casting her next film, STORMCHASER, plus writing her first feature-length script.


When not developing her own projects, Gretl leads award-winning creative on large events, such as Entertainment Weekly’s inaugural festival, PopFest (2016, Downtown LA), and IBM’s Amplify Conference on Watson Cognitive Marketing (2017, Las Vegas). One of Gretl’s specialties is merging live performance with state-of- the-art multimedia.


Gretl is passionate about using innovative technologies to organically tell visceral stories that
entertain and transform.

A Lionheart of Passion: Claude Kerven on Filmmaking

Claude Kerven is a filmmaker, screenwriter, director and teacher of filmmaking. He worked at his university’s radio station and its TV station because it was fun! - and only by happenstance discovered that there was such a thing as a degree in filmmaking - a degree he then got from NYU graduate school. He had much early success; a short film which received a student Academy Award got him an agent, followed by a stint of making short films for SNL.  A turn through Hollywood as a young director brought disappointment, a turn into teaching and parenting brought love. After years of putting filmmaking to the side, he is rediscovering the energy and joy in the creative process by challenging himself with a new genre, a musical! He has sage words of advice for anyone thinking about entering the world of filmmaking as a career. “If you don’t feel you have to do it, it may not be the right thing for you,” he says. “Having creativity is not enough. Being talented is not enough. A huge lionheart of passion and an endless supply of perseverance is needed to survive.”


Meet This Episode's Guest

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Claude Kerven

Claude Kervens’s career began with the debut of his short film, “Candy Store,” which won an Academy Award for Best Dramatic Student Film. In 1982, he directed a series of Afterschool Specials for ABC-TV, including the Emmy Award winning “Starstruck” and the Director’s Guild of America nominated “High School Narc.” Kerven also directed over 25 short films for Saturday Night Live, including the much celebrated “Synchronized Swimmers.” His most recent directorial work, “They Never Found Her,” starred Madmen’s Elisabeth Moss and Fargo’s Peter Storemare. In 1990, Kerven co-authored “Mortal Thoughts,” for Columbia Pictures, starring Bruce Willis, Harvey Keitel and Demi Moore.

Claude's Favorite Movie Quotes

Since I love comedies most of all, here are a few quotes from one of my absolute favorites, “The Sunshine Boys,” written by Neal Simon.

If you’re unfamiliar with the movie, Al Lewis (George Burns) and Willy Clark (Walter Matthau) play a pair of feuding vaudeville comedians (Lewis and Clark, naturally) who performed together for 47 years before finally calling it quits. A network genius then has the brilliant idea of reuniting the duo for a TV special about the history of comedy.

Here are a few of the most memorable lines. There are so many more.

 

Al Lewis: Oh, that Sol Burton. He died?

Willie Clark: Last week.

Al Lewis: Where?

Willie Clark: In Variety.

 

Ben Clark (Willie’s nephew): You’re not supposed to eat pickles. It’s high sodium.

Willy Clark: I spit out the sodium.

 

Ben Clark: I’m getting chest pains. You give me chest pains!

Willy Clark: It’s my fault you get excited?

Ben Clark: Yes! I only get chest pains on Wednesdays!

Willy Clark: So come Tuesdays.